Musings in Mozambique: Unattached and Unafraid

untitledThe only way to live is outside your comfort zone. Follow my two year adventure in Mozambique.


Latest posts on https://musingsinmozambiqueunattachedandunafraid.wordpress.com/:

  • Giving Birth in Mozambique
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    “Se é uma menina vai ter seu nome.” If it’s a girl I’ll name her after you. This was said to me by a woman I had met barely an hour ago. A woman who was clenching her mouth tighter together with every contraction refusing to allow even one scream to...
  • Why Hitchhiking Could Boost Your Foreign Language Skills
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    Suspend all disbelief and hear me out on this one, ok? If you will, maintain uma mente aberta. In my former normal (a.k.a the developed world) improving foreign language skills and hitchhiking would never be compatible. In fact, hitchhiking was never a thought in my realm of normal. But as you...
  • 5 Lessons I’ve Learned from Mozambique
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    It’s been said that it’s difficult to point out the nuances of your own culture. And it’s true. It’s really only once you step outside of your home culture that you’re better equipped to point them out. More difficult is to uncover why you behave the way you do and...
  • Talking About Death (and Life as Well)
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    I feel compelled to talk about death today. For some of you that might scare you away from this blog post. And I understand. The subject scares me too. But if anything I’ve learned from Peace Corps, it’s the urgency of facing your problems head on. The more they fester the...
  • Finding Personal Space (In a Country Where There Is None)
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    You like your personal space, right? I do too. You might have been taught in middle school about something called the “personal bubble.” No? Then allow me to teach you. Stick out both of your arms. Now allow them to surround the air in front of your body as far they’ll...
  • Mulungu Explored
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    I have a hate-hate relationship with the word “mulungu.” If you don’t remember, it means “white person” in the local language of Xitshwa. Sometimes it is thrown at me in the street after an enjoyable conversation with my host family or stranger. This three syllable word is enough to replace...