Little Backpack Big World

erictina_namibiaFollow Eric and Tina on the path to awareness, knowledge, and enlightenment as they serve as math and science teachers for Peace Corps Namibia.



Latest posts on http://www.littlebackpackbigworld.com:

  • Finding the Balance: Maintaining Your Training in a Time of Stress
    Starting a new job can be far more stressful than anticipated. When I began teaching as a Peace Corps Volunteer, I wasn’t nearly as ready as I thought. The coping mechanisms I had in place at my old job were so built in that I hadn’t realized that they were...
  • There is No “Me” in Service
    It is easy for me to fall into the mindset of viewing my Peace Corps experience as a single story of pure cynicism. Eric and I applied with the intentions of working in the environmental sector, but once that fell through, you could say we “settled” for education. Teaching is...
  • 3 Reasons Why Living in the 2nd Least Populated Country in the World is Awesome
    1. There is never any traffic A post shared by Tina Pico Photography (@tina_pico) on Dec 20, 2016 at 1:19pm PST There might be cars on the road now and again, but the traffic in Namibia could never compare to the brutal rush hours of any US city. So jump...
  • #desertvibes
    A post shared by Eric 🌀💚🍄🌿🌊 (@ericdanger) on Apr 14, 2017 at 2:47am PDT A post shared by Tina Pico Photography (@tina_pico) on Mar 26, 2017 at 4:49am PDT A post shared by Tina Pico Photography (@tina_pico) on Feb 7, 2017 at 1:01pm PST A post shared by Eric 🌀💚🍄🌿🌊...
  • Put Your Money to Good Use with Community Based Tourism
    If you like camping and also like putting your money to good use, then Namibia is the perfect place for you! Namibia has set up a collection of community campsites as part of their community based tourism industry. These campsites are run by locals and all of the money goes...
  • Wild Foods of Namibia: Maguni Fruit
    In this installment of “Wild Foods of Namibia” we’re introducing the Maguni Fruit, otherwise known as Kavango Oranges. Maguni are common in the northeast of Namibia along the Kavango and Zambezi Rivers. The hard shell protects seeds encased in a fleshy fruit that tastes like a combination of a banana...