From Alaska to Kosovo

Brittany_KosovoFollow along as I move from a remote Alaskan village to the new country of Kosovo with the Peace Corps.


Latest posts on https://brittanyinkosovo.wordpress.com/:

  • Transportation within Kosovo
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    I thought it would be helpful to give a summary of how to get in/out and around Kosovo for future travelers and potential Peace Corps Volunteers. Prishtina International Airport (PRN) This airport is located outside of Kosovo’s capital, Prishtina. It is small. Flight prices tend to be the highest in July and August,...
  • What do volunteers DO in the summer?
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    As a Peace Corps Volunteer in the education sector, my job during the school year is obviously teaching. But what about the summer? The school year in Kosovo is similar to most schools in the US. All schools here start on September 1st and most end in mid-June, but the end of...
  • 2 Turkish coffees + 3 macchiatos + 4 cups of tea = 1 day in Kosovo
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    Kosovo is a coffee culture. It is amazing. I did not know when I signed up for the Peace Corps that I would be moving to a coffee-lover’s paradise. Fellow coffee-drinkers: Get ready to become thoroughly jealous and prepare your bank-account, because you just might be buying a plane ticket to...
  • How does vacation work in the Peace Corps?
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    Many people imagine that being in the Peace Corps is just two years of wandering the globe, and it typically attracts people who love to travel. In reality, 95% of your service will be spent in the same village or city. If you have a hard time staying in the same...
  • Things we do that Kosovars consider odd
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    As I adjust to life in Kosovo, it’s easy to come up with a list of things about the culture that strike me as odd. But that’s not entirely fair. The cultural perceptions go both ways. What about how the American volunteers are¬†perceived by the Kosovars? I decided to start asking around...
  • Prom Kosovar Style!
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    I never expected that my Peace Corps country-of-service would have prom. Not only do Kosovars have it, but it puts American prom to shame. Because I taught 12th grade English for most of the year, I was invited to celebrate prom with the graduating class and the other teachers. All throughout...